“Medamulana Dynasty”: Four Sons and Three Grandsons of Don Alvin Rajapaksa

mylanka58

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  • Feb 8, 2016
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    Unlike many of his descendants D.A. Rajapaksa had no burning ambition for ministerial posts or enormous greed for political power. DA Rajapaksa was of that rare breed of simple politicians who did not lust after perks, posts and power


    It was D.M. Rajapaksa who first started the practice of wearing a kurakkan-coloured shawl to symbolize Giruwapattuwa. This was followed by his brother and later his sons. The ‘sataka’ worn by the Rajapaksas of today is not merely due to notions of sartorial elegance. The practice has deeper meaningful roots


    Don Alvin Rajapaksa married Dona Dandina Samarasinghe Dissanayake of Palatuwa, Matara. They had nine children – six boys and three girls. Their names are Chamal, Jayanthi, Mahinda, Tudor, Gotabaya, Basil, Dudley, Preethi and Gandani


    However a third political family that came into its own in the 21st century has de-throned one dynasty and threatens to send the other dynasty into virtual extinction. This of course is the “Medamulana Dynasty” comprising the family members of D.A. Rajapaksa. The Medamulna political dynasty of Don Alvin Rajapaksa has come to stay in Sri Lankan politics




    Basil Rohana Rajapaksa was sworn in as Finance minister in the Government of Sri Lanka by his brother President Gotabaya Rajapaksa on July 8, 2021. The appointment was hailed by Basil’s supporters who project the new Finance minister as the “saviour” who would liberate Sri Lanka from the economic morass into which the country is sinking. It is being said that the less dogmatic, more pragmatic Basil with the reputation of being “the man who gets things done” is the right choice to helm financial affairs at this point of time. The anti- Rajapaksa camp “Pooh-poohs” this claim saying Basil is only a visible symptom of the prevailing crisis and not the solution. They also point out that Sri Lanka is fast becoming a “failed state” and that Basil’s appointment as a remedy to the malady, demonstrates the failure of his brother the President to deliver. More