Long Covid Fatigue - Explained

imhotep

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  • Mar 29, 2017
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    Background: Mitochondria

    Mitochondria are membrane-bound cell organelles that generate most of the chemical energy needed to power the cell's biochemical reactions. Chemical energy produced by the mitochondria is stored in a small molecule called Adenosine TriPhosphate (ATP). Mitochondria contain their own small chromosomes and generally we only inherit Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from the mother. Nuclear DNA is inherited from both parents. In all mammals this is generally the case.
    Mitichondria has a peculiar arrangement with two different membranes - inner & outer - quite unusual for an intercellular organelle. These membranes function in the purpose of mitochondria, which is essentially to produce energy.
    These capsule-shaped organelles generate more than 90 percent of our energy, which is why they’re often called “the powerhouse of the cell.”
    Different cells have different amounts of mitochondria because they need more energy. So for example, the muscle has a lot of mitochondria, the liver does too, the kidney as well, and to a certain extent, the brain, which lives off of the energy those mitochondria produce. So if you have a defect in the pathways that the mitochondria usually functions with, you're going to have symptoms in the muscle, in the brain, sometimes in the kidneys as well; many different types of symptoms. And we probably don't know all of the different diseases that mitochondrial dysfunction causes.

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    Back to the topic -


    Researchers from Amsterdam UMC and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VU) have discovered that the persistent fatigue in patients with long-COVID has a biological cause, namely mitochondria in muscle cells that produce less energy than in healthy patients.

    "We saw various abnormalities in the muscle tissue of the patients. At the cellular level, we saw that the mitochondria of the muscle, also known as the energy factories of the cell, function less well and that they produce less energy," says Rob Wüst, Assistant Professor at Department of Human Movement Sciences at the VU University. "So, the cause of the fatigue is really biological. The brain needs energy to think. Muscles need energy to move. This discovery means we can now start to research an appropriate treatment for those with long-COVID," adds van Vugt.

    One of the theories about long-COVID is that coronavirus particles may remain in the body of people who have had the coronavirus. "We don't see any indications of this in the muscles at the moment," says Van Vugt. The researchers also saw that the heart and lungs functioned well in the patients. This means that the long-lasting effect on patient's fitness is not caused by abnormalities in the heart or lungs.
    Exercising is not always good for patients with long-COVID. "In concrete terms, we advise these patients to guard their physical limits and not to exceed them. Think of light exertion that does not lead to worsening of the complaints. Walking is good, or riding an electric bike, to maintain some physical condition. Keep in mind that every patient has a different limit," says Brent Appelman, researcher at Amsterdam UMC. "Because symptoms can worsen after physical exertion, some classic forms of rehabilitation and physiotherapy are counterproductive for the recovery of these patients," van Vugt adds.

    Although the majority of people infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus recover within weeks, a subgroup, estimated to be around one in eight, will get long-COVID. Symptoms in patients with long-COVID, post-acute sequelae or COVID or post-COVID syndrome (PCS) include severe cognitive problems (brain fog), fatigue, exercise intolerance, autonomic dysregulation, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), orthostatic intolerance, and worsening of symptoms after PEM. (Post-Exertional Malaise)

    PS: This is a peer reviewed study. But I have read previously - in early 2023 - researchers from Taiwan and also in the UK making the same claim. Both these teams reported independently that it's Mitochondrial dysfunction which is the root cause of Long-Covid fatigue.
     

    Bad_horse

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  • Apr 23, 2021
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    Vaccine, Vaccine ගෑවට ගොඩක් උන්ට ඇත්තටම තියෙන්නේ post covid syndrome එක. Memory problems, heart attacks, strokes

    1000096892.jpg
     

    RandomGuy

    Well-known member
  • Oct 15, 2014
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    Background: Mitochondria

    Mitochondria are membrane-bound cell organelles that generate most of the chemical energy needed to power the cell's biochemical reactions. Chemical energy produced by the mitochondria is stored in a small molecule called Adenosine TriPhosphate (ATP). Mitochondria contain their own small chromosomes and generally we only inherit Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from the mother. Nuclear DNA is inherited from both parents. In all mammals this is generally the case.
    Mitichondria has a peculiar arrangement with two different membranes - inner & outer - quite unusual for an intercellular organelle. These membranes function in the purpose of mitochondria, which is essentially to produce energy.
    These capsule-shaped organelles generate more than 90 percent of our energy, which is why they’re often called “the powerhouse of the cell.”
    Different cells have different amounts of mitochondria because they need more energy. So for example, the muscle has a lot of mitochondria, the liver does too, the kidney as well, and to a certain extent, the brain, which lives off of the energy those mitochondria produce. So if you have a defect in the pathways that the mitochondria usually functions with, you're going to have symptoms in the muscle, in the brain, sometimes in the kidneys as well; many different types of symptoms. And we probably don't know all of the different diseases that mitochondrial dysfunction causes.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Back to the topic -


    Researchers from Amsterdam UMC and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VU) have discovered that the persistent fatigue in patients with long-COVID has a biological cause, namely mitochondria in muscle cells that produce less energy than in healthy patients.

    "We saw various abnormalities in the muscle tissue of the patients. At the cellular level, we saw that the mitochondria of the muscle, also known as the energy factories of the cell, function less well and that they produce less energy," says Rob Wüst, Assistant Professor at Department of Human Movement Sciences at the VU University. "So, the cause of the fatigue is really biological. The brain needs energy to think. Muscles need energy to move. This discovery means we can now start to research an appropriate treatment for those with long-COVID," adds van Vugt.

    One of the theories about long-COVID is that coronavirus particles may remain in the body of people who have had the coronavirus. "We don't see any indications of this in the muscles at the moment," says Van Vugt. The researchers also saw that the heart and lungs functioned well in the patients. This means that the long-lasting effect on patient's fitness is not caused by abnormalities in the heart or lungs.
    Exercising is not always good for patients with long-COVID. "In concrete terms, we advise these patients to guard their physical limits and not to exceed them. Think of light exertion that does not lead to worsening of the complaints. Walking is good, or riding an electric bike, to maintain some physical condition. Keep in mind that every patient has a different limit," says Brent Appelman, researcher at Amsterdam UMC. "Because symptoms can worsen after physical exertion, some classic forms of rehabilitation and physiotherapy are counterproductive for the recovery of these patients," van Vugt adds.

    Although the majority of people infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus recover within weeks, a subgroup, estimated to be around one in eight, will get long-COVID. Symptoms in patients with long-COVID, post-acute sequelae or COVID or post-COVID syndrome (PCS) include severe cognitive problems (brain fog), fatigue, exercise intolerance, autonomic dysregulation, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), orthostatic intolerance, and worsening of symptoms after PEM. (Post-Exertional Malaise)

    PS: This is a peer reviewed study. But I have read previously - in early 2023 - researchers from Taiwan and also in the UK making the same claim. Both these teams reported independently that it's Mitochondrial dysfunction which is the root cause of Long-Covid fatigue.

    මටත් ඕක සෙට් උනා. ලෙඩේ හොඳ උනාම පට්ට අවුල් ගතියක් තිබුනා. ලෙඩේ හොඳ උනාට පස්සේ කර කර හිටපු වැඩක් අතට ගත්තා. ටිකක් සැර මැතක් තියෙන වැඩක්. කරන්න ගත්තට මෙලෝ දෙයක් හිතෙන්නෙ නැහැ. හෙනටම බැහැ වගේ සීන් එකක් දැනුනා වැඩේ ගැන හිතන්න. එහෙම උනාම පට්ට බයක් හිතුනා දිගටම මෙහෙම තිබුනොත් මටත් මේකේ ඉන්න අනෙත් එවුන් වගේ ජීවිතේ ඉතිරි ටික ගෙවන්න වෙයි කියල. 😬😬😬
     

    Miami-Vice

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  • Apr 19, 2010
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    තෑන්ක්ස්... වැක්සීන් ගහල තිබුනත් ඕව හැදෙනවද?
     
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    Nucleardeath

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  • Nov 22, 2012
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    Vaccine, Vaccine ගෑවට ගොඩක් උන්ට ඇත්තටම තියෙන්නේ post covid syndrome එක. Memory problems, heart attacks, strokes

    වැක්සීන් ගත්තේ නැති ඕන තරම් උන් ඉන්නවා කිසිම හෙනයක් නැති
     

    imhotep

    Well-known member
  • Mar 29, 2017
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    තෑන්ක්ස්... වැක්සීන් ගහල තිබුනත් ඕව හැදෙනවද?
    Overall, vaccination was associated with reduced risks or odds of long-COVID, with preliminary evidence suggesting that two doses are more effective than one dose.

    Vaccine, Vaccine ගෑවට ගොඩක් උන්ට ඇත්තටම තියෙන්නේ post covid syndrome එක. Memory problems, heart attacks, strokes

    View attachment 222475
    Sadly try explaining or convincing them.... :ROFLMAO:
    ------ Post added on Jan 10, 2024 at 2:09 PM

    තෑන්ක්ස්... වැක්සීන් ගහල තිබුනත් ඕව හැදෙනවද?
    @Miami-Vice - Read about this last night... just because you raised the question. Here are some details.

    One analysis of 24 studies published in October, found that people who'd had three doses of the COVID vaccine were 68.7% less likely to develop long COVID compared with those who were unvaccinated. "This is really impressive," says Alexandre Marra, a medical researcher at the Albert Einstein Israelite Hospital in Brazil and the lead author of the study. "Booster doses make a difference in long COVID".

    Another study published in November in the BMJ found that a single COVID vaccine dose reduced the risk of long COVID by 21%, two doses reduced it by 59% and three or more doses reduced it by 73%. Vaccine effectiveness clearly climbed with each successive dose.

    A study published last year in the Journal of the American Medical Association, other researchers found that the prevalence of long COVID in health care workers dropped from 41.8% in unvaccinated participants to 30% in those with a single dose, 17.4% with two doses and 16% with three doses.

    These studies were conducted in various countries with differing health care systems, demographics, COVID vaccination uptake and COVID prevalence. As such, it's got to ne noted that the COVID vaccines' effectiveness against long COVID will vary and may not be generalizable to other settings. Still, the consistency of the studies' findings is telling — regardless of their settings, many studies agree that boosters provide potent protection against long COVID.


    ------ Post added on Jan 11, 2024 at 5:49 AM
     
    Last edited:

    Miami-Vice

    Well-known member
  • Apr 19, 2010
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    Overall, vaccination was associated with reduced risks or odds of long-COVID, with preliminary evidence suggesting that two doses are more effective than one dose.


    Sadly try explaining or convincing them.... :ROFLMAO:
    ------ Post added on Jan 10, 2024 at 2:09 PM


    @Miami-Vice - Read about this last night... just because you raised the question. Here are some details.

    One analysis of 24 studies published in October, found that people who'd had three doses of the COVID vaccine were 68.7% less likely to develop long COVID compared with those who were unvaccinated. "This is really impressive," says Alexandre Marra, a medical researcher at the Albert Einstein Israelite Hospital in Brazil and the lead author of the study. "Booster doses make a difference in long COVID".

    Another study published in November in the BMJ found that a single COVID vaccine dose reduced the risk of long COVID by 21%, two doses reduced it by 59% and three or more doses reduced it by 73%. Vaccine effectiveness clearly climbed with each successive dose.

    A study published last year in the Journal of the American Medical Association, other researchers found that the prevalence of long COVID in health care workers dropped from 41.8% in unvaccinated participants to 30% in those with a single dose, 17.4% with two doses and 16% with three doses.

    These studies were conducted in various countries with differing health care systems, demographics, COVID vaccination uptake and COVID prevalence. As such, it's got to ne noted that the COVID vaccines' effectiveness against long COVID will vary and may not be generalizable to other settings. Still, the consistency of the studies' findings is telling — regardless of their settings, many studies agree that boosters provide potent protection against long COVID.


    ------ Post added on Jan 11, 2024 at 5:49 AM
    :love2:
     
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