Why some people do not get sick with Covid.

imhotep

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  • Mar 29, 2017
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    A gene mutation explains why people who contract COVID-19 but never develop symptoms -- the so-called super dodgers - exist. The secret lies with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), or protein markers that signal the immune system. A mutation in one of the genes coding for HLA appears to help virus-killing T cells identify SARS-CoV-2 and launch a lightning attack. The T cells of some people who carry this variant can identify the novel coronavirus, even if they have never encountered it before, thanks to its resemblance to the seasonal cold viruses they already know. The discovery points to new targets for drugs and vaccines.

    The mutation -- HLA-B*15:01 -- is quite common, carried by about 10% of the study's population. It doesn't prevent the virus from infecting cells but, rather, prevents people from developing any symptoms. That includes a runny nose or even a barely noticeable sore throat.  It's like having an army that's able to recognize the enemy early.
     

    imhotep

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  • Mar 29, 2017
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    TFS. Is this the same condition with asymptomatic people? And can these people become carriers?
    Yes.. On this study, 136 individuals remained asymptomatic for at least two weeks before and after testing positive. Only one of the HLA variants -- HLA-B*15:01 -- had a strong association with asymptomatic COVID-19 infection, and this was reproduced in two independent cohorts. Risk factors for severe COVID-19, like being older, overweight and having chronic diseases like diabetes did not appear to play a role in who remained asymptomatic. 
     

    Purple2022

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  • Jun 30, 2023
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    A gene mutation explains why people who contract COVID-19 but never develop symptoms -- the so-called super dodgers - exist. The secret lies with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), or protein markers that signal the immune system. A mutation in one of the genes coding for HLA appears to help virus-killing T cells identify SARS-CoV-2 and launch a lightning attack. The T cells of some people who carry this variant can identify the novel coronavirus, even if they have never encountered it before, thanks to its resemblance to the seasonal cold viruses they already know. The discovery points to new targets for drugs and vaccines.

    The mutation -- HLA-B*15:01 -- is quite common, carried by about 10% of the study's population. It doesn't prevent the virus from infecting cells but, rather, prevents people from developing any symptoms. That includes a runny nose or even a barely noticeable sore throat.  It's like having an army that's able to recognize the enemy early.
    Tfs
     
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    KrishanL89

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  • Sep 12, 2020
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    If you are resolute in mind, neither disease nor anything else can let you down. :yes:

    -Candid-B
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